Thursday, October 09, 2008

Where does he keep his armies?

Karl Merk, a German farmer, has become the first person to receive a double arm transplant! He lost his arms below the shoulder six years ago in a farming accident but, thanks to long and extensive surgery earlier this year, he now has two brand new arms. So far his body hasn't rejected them and he is able to move his fingers, open doors and turn on lights. Doctors are hopeful that, all going well, he will have full movement in his new arms within two years.
Wow. I mean WOW wow. I thought a face transplant was amazing. They will have a head museum next.
Read the story here.
Best of luck to Mr Merk, it really is an amazing thing and I hope that his arms heal really well and he is able to do all the things he hasn't been able to in the last six years. However, am I the only one thinking it - evil arms anyone? If I were him, I think I would be a little bit worried.

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

Do you mean evil arms which would do things the man didn't intend? Are they artificial arms or some poor dead person's arms? Fascinating all the same, amazing surgery and nice to know the poor farmer is armed again

Inkpot said...

Yes, I mean evil arms that have their own agenda and strangle people while the poor man sleeps. They are real arms, donated by a teenager apparently. My question is - if they were so great, why did he get rid of them? Presumably he died before donating his arms, but that makes me wonder - were they responsible for his death??

On a more serious note, it is an amazing medical and surgical achievment and wonderful for the farmer, his family and loved ones.

Valpot said...

AH the mind of a brilliant horror writer, a scarey thought!

Still it's amazing what they can do these days, though I still thonk operating on the unborn child is one of the most amazing.

Inkpot said...

Operating on an unborn child is amazing all right, VT. I think one of my favourites is the man without a heart though. He is connected up to a machine that works as his heart and he can wheel it around the house. Something about being heartless makes me think of the greater implications than mere medical science.